What about demolition of historic structures?
A COA is required to demolish a structure or to move a structure within the district. The Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) cannot deny a COA request for demolition but can delay demolition for up to 365 days. This time period can be reduced when extreme hardship is demonstrated by the property owner or for properties of no special historical significance. The intent of the 365-day delay is to provide an opportunity for the owner and the community to explore options for the structure other than demolition and to document the resource prior to demolition. The only time denial of a demolition request is permitted is when the property in question has been designated as having statewide significance. The parameters governing a COA for demolition also apply to the relocation of a structure outside of a local district.

Show All Answers

1. What is a local historic district?
2. How is a local historic district designated?
3. What is a local historic landmark?
4. How is a local historic landmark designated?
5. What are the benefits of local historic landmark designation?
6. What is the National Register?
7. What are the benefits and responsibilities of National Register listing?
8. What is a Certificate of Appropriateness (COA)?
9. What work requires a COA?
10. How do I know if a property needs a COA?
11. Who reviews COA applications?
12. What about demolition of historic structures?
13. What is demolition by neglect?
14. What are the criteria for establishing a condition of demolition by neglect?
15. What is the process for determining demolition by neglect?
16. What are the outcomes in establishing a condition of demolition by neglect?
17. How do I find the zoning on my property?
18. What is being built on a property near me?